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This week's attacks in Europe will not be the last

Hand-picked stories from this week's issue of The Economist.
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  Editor’s picks   March 23rd 2016  
 
The Economist
 
Unusually, this week we have three different covers. In Europe we report on co-ordinated attacks in Brussels which reveal that Islamic State is stronger and more resourceful than intelligence services had feared. Coming just four months after the assault on Paris, Tuesday’s terrorism marks a new normal

In Latin America we argue that the time has come for Dilma Rousseff, Brazil’s tarnished president, to resign. When she hired her predecessor, Luiz Ignácio Lula da Silva, as chief of staff last week, possibly to save him from prosecution, she put the interest of her political tribe above the rule of law

Everywhere else we warn about the persistent and egregious profits of big American firms. Their returns on equity are 40% higher at home than abroad. A very profitable firm has an 80% chance of still being very profitable a decade later, compared with a 50% chance in the 1990s. It’s high time for a blast of competition

Zanny Minton Beddoes, Editor-in-Chief
 
 
 
China’s cities
Rural residents are largely shut out of China’s booming property market. That feeds inequality and hobbles China
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Rural residents are largely shut out of China’s booming property market. That feeds inequality and hobbles China
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Missing the point
Some Western countries have lower vaccination rates than parts of Africa—and anti-vaxxers are not the main culprits
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They’re reaching for the stars—and they’re barely out of school. Watch the fifth film in our “Future Works” series, which looks at the people doing tomorrow’s jobs today
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Technology and government
Our special report looks at how democracy will change as social media fragment political power and big data centralise it
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Our special report looks at how democracy will change as social media fragment political power and big data centralise it
READ MORE >
 
 
Space invaders
They’re reaching for the stars—and they’re barely out of school. Watch the fifth film in our “Future Works” series, which looks at the people doing tomorrow’s jobs today
WATCH MORE >
 
They’re reaching for the stars—and they’re barely out of school. Watch the fifth film in our “Future Works” series, which looks at the people doing tomorrow’s jobs today
WATCH MORE >
 
Politics this week
Britain’s Conservative Party was rocked by the resignation of Iain Duncan Smith as welfare minister; he claimed that cuts to disability benefits were “a compromise too far” in a government budget that favoured higher earners. A supporter of Brexit, the timing of his departure has been questioned. His successor promptly reversed the cuts, leaving a £4.4 billion ($6.3 billion) hole in the budget. George Osborne, the chancellor, saw his future leadership hopes dashed further as open rebellion over the budget broke out within the party
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MORE FROM POLITICS THIS WEEK >
 
Business this week
The saga at Valeant rumbled on. Michael Pearson decided to quit as chief executive of the troubled Canadian drugmaker. He acknowledged that the past few months, during which time the company has been criticised for introducing whopping price increases on heart medicines and has come under federal investigation for its ties to an online pharmacy, have been “difficult”
SEE ARTICLE >
MORE FROM BUSINESS THIS WEEK >
 
 
 
 
 
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